The LIAT aircraft receives the traditional spraying of water as it arrives in Antigua. (Photo: LIAT/Facebook)

LIAT’s acting Chief Executive Officer, Julie Reifer-Jones, says et modernization of the airline’s fleet is an important part of its strategy to deliver better on-time performance, higher levels of customer satisfaction while adding to the airline’s stellar safety record.

LIAT is spending US$100 million to buy new planes, and its sixth ATR aircraft arrived last Sunday.

Reifer-Jones said that for far too long, people using the regional carrier had to suffer lengthy delays due to aging and difficult to service aircraft which at times led to sub-par customer service delivery.

“We remain steadfast in our commitment to raise the standard of customer service throughout the LIAT network; and 2014 is the year when our customers and the general public will see that we are determined to serve the region better,” Reifer-Jones said.

“We will do everything to deliver a better product and late last year we set things in motion with our company-wide customer service training or ‘brand camp’. This programme will continue in 2014.”

Emphasizing LIAT will not accept poor customer service, she pledged, “The public deserves better and we will do better.”

LIAT pilots, Captain Chris Cameron and First Officer Oran Challenger with flight engineer Gregory Marcano flew the latest ATR-42 aircraft across the Atlantic from Toulouse, France, arriving at V.C. Bird International Airport in Antigua, on Sunday.

LIAT now has a fleet of six new ATR Aircraft – two ATR-42s, each with 48 seats; and four ATR-72s, each with 68 seats.

The fleet modernisation is expected to be completed by the end of 2014.

4 replies on “As 6th new plane arrives, LIAT promises better customer service”

  1. We are experiencing delays from the service personnel more than the planes themselves. We hope the ground staff can be more service oriented, and work to get the planes off the ground in a quick turn around time. Too many times they run on and off the planes like chickens without heads, delaying takeoff for overly long periods.

  2. Patrick Ferrari says:

    6th or 60 planes are not going to solve the problem.

    The ground staff is not the problem either.

    The problem is people confuse the amount of votes they get with the amount
    of talent they have.

  3. Daniel F Pope says:

    As I see it, liat is likely in a process of redesigning its public profile to fit that of most low cost carriers. That is not to say that some Caribbean states like SVG have much of a choice; but like Ryan air, the aim is to set public expectations so low that one actually compliments the carrier when it gets something right. Bravo liat .
    Its hard to sink lower when you are at rock bottom. Which seasoned liat flyer does not take a change of clothing with them in their carry on? This is because no one seriously expects to receive their luggage as and when they land at their destination. If you do receive your luggage,no matter how late or crap the flight was, one is still thankful. See, it is working already.

  4. There can be no doubt at all these aircraft are not suitable for the purpose we require them for. They will cause delays year on year because of the wind factor which stops the taking off and landing for safety reasons.

    We should of sent them back and cancelled the order the moment that Ian Brunton ran the length of the runaway and took off for other pastures.

    We should hold Brunton and the Chairman of the shareholders Ralph Gonsalves fully responsible for this folley.

    Remember TT’s Caribbean Air got rid of Brunton and sent their aircraft back, we then bought the same planes.

    It stinks like a pair of Greek wrestlers’ shorts

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