The two men, Anlee Parsons, left, and Hyah Browne leave the Serious Offences Court in November 2019. The case against them was withdrawn on Friday. (iWN photo)

The hearing of an application to have two Vincentian men extradited to Grenada in connection with a robbery there will take place next Friday at the Serious Offences Court in Kingstown.

The hearing was scheduled for this past Tuesday but was adjourned, as Crown Counsel Karim Nelson, who has charge of the matter, is overseas on training.

Anlee Parsons and Hyah Browne, both 23, of Carriere, are alleged to have robbed the Carriacou branch of the Grenada Union of Teachers Credit Union of EC$26,205.60 around 8:30 a.m. on Oct. 11, 2019.

The men were arrested in St. Vincent on Oct. 25.

Senior Prosecutor Adolphus Delplesche told the court that Nelson was expected to be overseas for one week, but was ready to proceed.

However, defence counsel Grant Connell asked what exactly Delplesche meant when he said Nelson was ready to proceed.

The lawyer said he has not been served with any documentation at all.

“Is this an investigator or a procedure that has to be followed…?” he said.

The lawyer said that he had before him an application for a provisional warrant by Sergeant of Police Irakie Huggins.

Connell said that the warrant was granted and the next document he has is an application for bail, which was also granted.

“What is before this honourable court that would put my learned friend in a position to proceed today?” Connell said.

But Delplesche said that he did not say which way the prosecution was ready to proceed.

“I did not. All I said, I am ready to proceed,” Delplesche said, noting that the Crown did not oppose the application for bail.

Connell said that is why the court should tell the prosecution that if they are ready to proceed a certain way, there is a procedure involving certain documentation from certain officers that have to come before the court in a certain time.

“If they are not proceeding that way, obviously which they are not, because I don’t have the necessary documentation, let them do the honourable thing.”

Connell said that his clients have been carried through “a very disrespectful course.

“How foreigners were able to come into my land, take two of my people, lock them up, pen them and want to throw them on a ship and carry them on a different island — or plane – and the prosecution just sit and allow that?

“Had they not been from this social background, it would not happen. They must do the honourable thing today…” he said, adding that his clients’ liberty is more important than Nelson’s course in Barbados.

“The DPP, the learned DPP, the honourable DPP, Sejilla McDowald should do the honourable thing. Don’t send the messenger with that kind of message,” the lawyer said, adding that he was very offended.

“These two poor men should not even be here.”

But Delplesche said he could not understand why Connell was offended.

“We are in a law court, procedures are to be followed. If we didn’t follow procedure, that’s not an offence. We just didn’t follow,” Delplesche said.

He added that the history of the case has shown that the prosecution is “heading in a particular direction.

“And the direction in which we are heading should not offend my friend,” he said.

However, the chief magistrate said she could understand the lawyer’s agitation.

Delplesche said he, too, could understand it.

The chief magistrate, however, said that while Delplesche did not have charge of the matter, he understands Connell’s agitation.

Browne said that the matter should be disposed of soon and set the date for the extradition hearing for next week Friday, Feb. 21.  

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