LIAT’s new CEO, Julie Reifer-Jones.

ST. JOHN’S, Antigua — Regional carrier, LIAT on Tuesday announced the appointment of Julie Reifer-Jones as the airline’s chief executive officer.

The announcement confirms Reifer-Jones in the position in which she had acted since Briton David Evans, resigned in April 2016, after just two years on the job.

Evans had replaced Captain Ian Brunton, who resigned in September 2013, after just one year in the top post.

The new LIAT chief executive is a graduate of The University of the West Indies, a Fellow of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) and a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Barbados.

Prior to joining LIAT, as chief financial officer in 2008, Reifer-Jones held several senior finance positions and has more than 25 years of experience in the fields of finance and management.

LIAT says Reifer-Jones stated she is delighted to be taking up this new challenge as the airlines CEO and is looking forward to delivering an improved level of service from LIAT to the region.

Reifer-Jones is the first woman to be appointed CEO of LIAT.

In announcing her appointment, Chairman of the Board of LIAT, Jean Holder noted “Mrs. Reifer-Jones has served at LIAT in the number two position for some nine years and in that capacity has acted as CEO for extended periods on several occasions. In addition to her familiarity with the people and culture of the region and her intimate knowledge of the company, her financial and academic qualifications should complement the practical experience of the airline industry she has acquired on the job. I wish her well as she undertakes one of the most challenging assignments in the region.”

7 COMMENTS

  1. In addition to her experience and qualification in the field of Finance, i hope she brings a new vision because that is what the troubled airline so desperately needs.

  2. We all hope that the air travel situation in the region improves. It seems it is not the management of Liat that is the problem. It is the conditions the shareholder governments place on the company. The tremendous financial rewards the governments get at the expense of the customers and Liat staff make sure the company is always going to be in trouble no matter who manages it. The greed of the Caribbean Governments and Ralph Gonsalves can only spell financial troubles.

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