Captions: Lawyer, Alicia Dells (second from left; back row) between lawyers Julian Jack (first from left), and Cecil Blazer Williams (third from left), uncle Collie Dells (4th from left), mom Paula Dells (5th from left), cousin Kyron Dells (6th from left), aunt Necla Dells (7th from left) and grandmother Rita Dells (front row).

Barbadian/Vincentian Alicia Dells, a former journalist, was admitted to practise as a barrister-at-law and solicitor in St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Tuesday.

Dells, who is already a member of the Barbados Bar Association (BBA), was admitted to practise law in Barbados in October 2014.

She was introduced to the Vincentian bar by lawyer Cecil Blazer Williams and seconded by Julian Jack.

She was born in Barbados to a Vincentian mother and grew up in St. Vincent, where she pursued her primary education at the Stubbs Government School, her secondary at the Girls’ High School and then went on to the St. Vincent Community College. She later moved back to Barbados to pursue her university education and continues to reside there.

Dells obtained an honours law degree from the University of the West Indies Cave Hill campus in Barbados and her legal education certificate from the Hugh Wooding Law School in Trinidad and Tobago.

The young attorney’s application to be admitted to the local bar was heard before Justice Esco Henry.

In delivering her response, Dells acknowledged God, her family, the local attorneys who facilitated her call, her friend counsel, Ranelle Roberts-Williams, and other friends who offered their support and encouragement during her time of study and thereafter.

She especially thanked her mother, Paula Dells, her grandmother, Rita Dells, her uncle, Collie Dells and her aunt Necla Dells, who were all present at the hearing.

She noted that she was only able to make it thus far through the various sacrifices made by her mother, saying, “I am grateful for my mother, who sacrificed her story so that my story could be told.”

Dells promised to uphold the standards of the legal profession and noted that she will continue to practise law with honesty and integrity while being mindful of her duty to give back to her community, saying, “To whom much is given, much is expected”.

She also shared her experience as an attorney in Barbados where she currently practises in chambers as a general practitioner.

She has a keen interest in human rights and social justice and since 2014 has been an executive member of the SAVE Foundation, a leading non-profit in Barbados which spreads awareness and advocates on behalf of victims of domestic abuse.

Since 2015, Dells has delivered several presentations across Barbados on the Legal Response to Domestic Violence in Barbados with particular emphasis on the Domestic Violence (Protection Orders) Act and its 2016 amendments.

One reply on “Former journalist admitted to the Bar”

  1. Is this really news? Does St Vincent need more lawyers. I don’t see the same hoopla when some one graduates from Medical or Engineering school. These are the professions that contribute to the positive development of a society. Think about it; What does the legal profession really do for humanity? Nothing but capitalize on that which goes wrong; Someone commits a crime , they need a lawyer;Getting a divorce they need lawyer; land dispute, deportation…….name it they need a lawyer at some exorbitant price that only god knows how to justify. Some lawyers make from one case what a teacher makes in a year and one doesn’t have to be very bright to be a lawyer. This is the only profession that you can start from any discipline and end up as a practitioner; you can begin with, natural sciences, sociology, economics, psychology ….and end up as a lawyer; Compare this the medical profession; a doctor has a defined academic path to the end…..The lawyer you start with anything… even as a policeman and after few academic gymnastics you get called to the bar. What a scam!!!

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