Persons at the St. Vincent and the Grenadines Cannabis Revival Committee meeting. Cottle is at front left.

More than 25 persons representing cannabis growers and consumers from several communities throughout St. Vincent and the Grenadines met at Victoria Park on Monday to discuss government’s announcement to legalise medical cannabis.

The meeting, which was called by the St. Vincent and the Grenadines Cannabis Revival Committee (SVGCRC) was presided over by Junior Spirit Cottle, who is also the committee’s president and Vice President Ajit Duncan.

The meeting looked at the restructuring of the organisation to enable it to operate more effectively.

The SVGCRC has been calling for alternative livelihood for growers, medical cannabis and decriminalisation, as well as the legal right of Rastas to use cannabis as a religious sacrament.

“In the fight for the reform of cannabis laws, concessions are more often given to consumers of the plants rather than the producers, who have little or no other form of livelihood, and who see their crops often eradicated,” Cottle said in a press statement.

He said the SVGCRC supports the move to legalise medical cannabis as it continues to call for the decriminalisation and the religious freedom of marijuana as a sacrament.

“The CRC views medical cannabis as a stepping stone to our other objectives,” Cottle said.

“To this end, we call on the ULP (Unity Labour Party) government to ensure that our traditional farmers become an integral part of the process, that the new law reflects the interest of the growers; and that our country and people become the principal benefactors of any such industry to be established.

“We also call on the opposition New Democratic Party (NDP) to support us on our way forward.

The following persons were elected as executive members to fill some vacancies:

Fitz Allan Lewis, Frankie Paul, Conliff Pompey, Wycliffe Dickson, Berkley Delpleshe, Osborne Caine, and Sydney Joseph.

5 replies on “Cannabis group discusses medical marijuana sector”

  1. If medical marijuana is ever produced in SVG — a highly unlikely prospect — these growers would sidelined by its highly technical and large financial-investment nature. Only overseas investors and a few government-favoured local people would ever benefit.

  2. Good luck, but don’t hold your breath! Like the regular farmers of this country, you too would be left to graze on the poor marginal lands of the medical marijuana pasture. Don’t expect anything different from this government. It is for their own interest only! Wake up and see the truth of what really is going in this country. But don’t give up, continue the struggles for this country is not for any one government but for every single Vincy.

  3. So Ben tell me this if the government strike a deal to have investors come in to grow and export medical Marijuana you’re telling me the citizens will not benefit from any paid taxes or incentives by these companies…. If that’s the case this gov will be very incompetent with contract negotiations and because of past bad dealings I don’t think they will let that happen

  4. Rasta man, realize that almost everything in this world is political. If you want the system to change get involved and change it yourself. Stop sitting on the sideline and say rasta nah do this or that! These are not the times of old, these are new times and the only way to get things done is get involved in the political system to get the change you need, otherwise no one going to do it for you, scene!!!

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