A Belmont man who entered an Edinboro woman’s home late at night with intent to steal has been jailed for his crime.

Jamal George, 29, was handed the prison sentence at the end of a hearing in which Senior Prosecutor Adolphus Delplesche noted that while George had two previous convictions for similar offences he had never before been jailed.

“He has been given two chances. He has been given two suspended sentences. He has never entered the prison. It is time now for him to enter,” Delplesche told the Serious Offences Court on Monday.
Chief Magistrate Rechanne Browne jailed George for six months after he pleaded guilty to a charge that on Sept. 9, at Edinboro, he entered the home of Allie Williams as a trespasser with intent to commit an offence to wit, theft.

The chief magistrate, after considering the aggravating and mitigating features of the case, arrived at a sentence of nine months. George, however, received the maximum one-third discount on his sentence, having pleaded guilty.   

About 3:41 a.m. on the date in question, Williams was walking from her bedroom to the bathroom when she saw a curtain on the southern side of the house flying.

Williams had left the window open slightly, but saw that it was ajar and George was putting his head through the window.

The homeowner opened the window and saw George’s face and alerted her son, who was in the downstairs of the house.

George ran but Williams reported the matter to the police who arrested him at Little Tokyo, Kingstown on Oct. 4.

In mitigation, George told the court that he works with Kingstown Town Board and used to help Williams put out her wares and used to go to her house, adding, “I lock she off”.

At this point, the chief magistrate stopped George and told him that he should address the court on sentencing.

George then told the court that he works for the government and that he is the son of a man who “they kill and put in the sewerage tank”.

The defendant also said something about “a little house” in relation to his father, but it was not clear what he was saying.

The chief magistrate asked George if she was supposed to know about his father, adding, “They’re killing people all the time”.

She noted, however, that he had two convictions for an offence similar to the one for which he was before the court.

“Me?” George asked.

“That’s why I asked you your birthdate and they coincide,” the chief magistrate told George in reference to a question she had asked him earlier.

In handing down the sentence, the chief magistrate said she had considered the consequence and seriousness of the crime, the potential for emotional distress and injury to the complainant.

Browne said that by George’s own admission, there was breach of trust.

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