A High Court Judge says that he was not impressed by the manner in which a police officer, who testified in a trial last week, performed his duties.

The police officer, Police Constable Kevon Creese, told the court that his brother, Ricardo Audain, had told him where Audain had hid an unlicensed firearm, but Creese never made an effort to retrieve the weapon. 

Justice Brian Cottle expressed his view at High Court No. 1, in Kingstown, on Friday after a jury found Audain, of Barrouallie, and Orbon “Roach” Lampkin, of Chateaubelair, guilty of wounding with intent and firearm and ammunition charges.

Cottle told Crown Counsel Karim Nelson, who prosecuted the matter, that when police officers appear in the court and do exemplary work, he (the judge) says so, so that the officers can be recognised.

“Sadly, I cannot say so in this case,” Justice Cottle said.

The judge said that Constable Creese “did not impress me in the way he performed his duties as a police officer, and I must say so”.

He said that when police officers do well they are complimented and when they do not do well, they must be told, so that they can improve on their performance.

Creese testified on behalf of the defence in the case in which his brother and Lampkin were found guilty of several offences in connection with an Aug. 26, 2014 shooting at Keartons.

Lampkin was found guilty of a charge that on Aug. 26, 2014 at Keartons, he wounded Disley Harry with intent to do so.

He was further found guilty of possession of a firearm with intent to cause injury to Harry, possession of a firearm without a licence, and possession of ammunition without a licence, to wit two rounds of ammunition.

Audain was found guilty of possession of a firearm without a licence, and possession of ammunition without a licence, to wit five rounds of .45 ammunition.

The jury took three hours to return unanimous guilty verdicts on all charges, except for the ammunition charge against Audain upon which they were split 7-2 in their guilty verdict.

The virtual complainant had refused to give evidence in the case, telling the trial that he could not remember who had shot him and that he did not want to lie.

This led to police arresting him and a perjury investigation being launched.

No charges have been laid as a result of that investigation.

The two men have been remanded in custody until their sentencing on March 11.

One reply on “Judge not impressed with cop’s conduct”

  1. Gun possession is a problem in SVG. It appears that only certain persons can apply for a license and other can’t. What are the criterion for applying for a gun license and who can apply?
    Business persons should be allowed to own a gun to protect their business, property and themselves. Gun owners should not carry guns around in the open. This should also hold good for policemen. The police should use hand-cuffs to move prisoners around, instead of an AK47.
    Home owners should be allowed to own a gun to protect them from criminals who may enter their homes to assault them. They should not be allowed to carry a gun in the open. Anyone who pulls out a gun or discharge a gun should be investigated.
    Gun licenses can and should be revoked if the police receives a report of abuse about a gun license owner. The gun should also be taken away. The Cuban woman would be alive if the gun was removed from the criminal‘s possession.
    A gun in a home should not be a criminal offense. The owner should be asked to request a license. Vincentians should have the ability to protect themselves and their property. The business woman who was attacked and robbed should have had some protection, especially if she moves around with money – which to me was a stupid idea.
    Gun licenses should be reviewed regularly – every 3 – 5 years. This will ensure the laws are followed and the person is still capable of possessing a gun. A person mental capacity could be diminished and this could be a sign to remove the gun and the license.

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