Businessman, Leon “Bigger Bigs” Samuel. (IWN file photo)

Businessman Leon “Bigger Bigs” Samuel is expected to know his fate next Wednesday as magistrate Carla James has reserved her verdict following a trial on four traffic offences ended at the Kingstown Magistrate on Wednesday.

On Sept. 17, Samuel was arrested while picketing outside the Methodist Building in Kingstown, which houses Attorney General Judith Jones-Morgan’s office.

Police said he parked his motor vehicle, PR382, in a no-parking area and refused to move it when instructed to do so. He was taken to the Central Police Station where he was charged with failing to comply with a No Parking road sign; obstructing the free flow of traffic at Granby Street; failing to remove his motor vehicle, PR382, when instructed to do so, and deliberately allowing his motor vehicle to remain on the public road so as to cause an obstruction to traffic.

The prosecution, led by Assistant Superintendent of Police (ASP) Glenford Gregg, called four witnesses, including traffic officer Sergeant Junior Nero, Constable Derrick Humphrey.

The witnesses testified that Samuel’s vehicle was parked at the area that was a no-parking zone and that it was obstructing other vehicles from passing. They said he was spoken to but he refused to remove the vehicle.

Samuel’s lawyers, Stanley “Stalky” John Q.C. and Akin John, made a submission of no-case but the magistrate over-ruled it, saying she found there was a case to answer.

Samuel, during his evidence-in-chief, said the purpose of his picket was to highlight the injustice of the shutting down of his multi-million dollar business in 2011, when authorities revoked his mining licence.

“They asked me to move and I responded to them that I was there picketing to get the attention of the Attorney General and I do not wish to move until I get the attention of the Attorney General,” Samuel told the court.

Samuel said there were three police officers and one of them asked him to give them the keys to his vehicle. He said that after he did not give the officer the keys, traffic officer sergeant Junior Nero told him if they arrested him then they would get the keys.

“He arrested me by putting me into the police vehicle. I co-operated and there was no hostility. They took me out of the vehicle and proceeded to search my pockets and they took the keys for the vehicle. They put me back into the vehicle and transported me to the barracks in their own vehicle,” he told the court.

When Samuel was cross-examined by the prosecutor, Samuel said he had driving experience of about 25 years. He said was familiar with most of the road signs. He said he saw similar signs — as the one outside the Methodist Building — around Kingstown and he observed that vehicles were usually parked there. He pointed out that there was one not too far away in the Long Wall area where former Commissioner of Police, Keith Miller’s, mother lived. He said Miller’s motor vehicle was often parked there.

He reiterated his statement when the prosecutor asked him about the former commissioner.

When the prosecutor asked him about his vehicle obstructing traffic, Samuel said that because of his frame of mind he was on that day he “couldn’t see” that he “was causing an obstruction.” He told the court he was not in an angry mood, when questioned.

He said persons could have passed where the vehicle was, but there was not enough space for a vehicle to pass.

“That day, my mind was set on getting the attention of people,” he told the court.

Asked if all he cared about at the time was getting people’s attention and that if it meant the world had to come to a stand still then so be it, Samuel said it was not that he did not care about people.

“The world did not come to a stand still. Persons were free to go where they wanted to,” Samuel said.

The Bigger Trucking and Block Construction Company’s CEO further said that the only person whose world came to a standstill at that time was he, because his liberty was restrained as he was not free to go where he wanted, having been in custody for about six hours.

11 replies on “Bigger Bigs trial verdict to come on Wednesday”

  1. Clynton Morris says:

    What I’m about to say is objective and in no way prejudice “Bigger Samuel’s” case, but I feel pressed to say something even now pre judgement that will take place next week.

    The last paragraphs in this piece of “Bigger’s” reply to prosecution questions is the give away and underlines what is wrong and what so wrong about politics and society in SVG in particular and the Caribbean in general. Here’s a businessman, successful it is claimed and this is the key – one believes that this businessman carried away with the name “Bigger” and success believes he’s above the law.

    he “couldn’t see” that he “was causing an obstruction.” He told the court he was not in an angry mood, when questioned.

    He said persons could have passed where the vehicle was, but there was not enough space for a vehicle to pass.

    “That day, my mind was set on getting the attention of people,” he told the court.

    Asked if all he cared about at the time was getting people’s attention and that if it meant the world had to come to a stand still then so be it, Samuel said it was not that he did not care about people.

    “The world did not come to a stand still. Persons were free to go where they wanted to,” Samuel said.

    The sad thing about his cockiness wasn’t only what he had to say, but the support – political I must say from the NDP/supporters and ‘businessmen’ alike.

    When are we in the Caribbean going to get into rationale and objective thinking: let’s us try that and debate around facts.

  2. How come for a simple traffic offence verdict is reserved. What could be so difficult in comming to a decision based on the facts. I hope fear and politics do not become an issue demanding consultation as appeared to bethe case in a recent high profile case.
    Come on who is Mr Samuel.Just pass your sentence. Don’t be afraid of loudmouth Lucette and the other windbags.They all have their agenda.
    Do your work.

  3. I have never commented before on the Bigger Bigs issue because I don’t know the facts of the case. I do believe, though, that Biggs chose not to take the government to court for the loss of his license, something that leaves me suspicious of the man as does his behaviour in picketing the government, including this incident.

    I also know that illegal sand mining, environmental destruction, poluting, dumping, etc. rampant in SVG. So I wouldn’t be surprised if Biggs’ license was removed for good reason. I would also not be surprised if others guilty of the same offense were not prosecuted because they were strong government supporters.

    1. Mr C. ben-David, you sound like a reasoned type of person and wish there were more balanced views as yours instead of the vile that come from the cheer leaders hate and one-sided hate coming of SVG from people of one particular colour/type.

      So glad that somebody is singing from the same hymn sheet as I’m.

  4. How come the government can charge you on Monday and get you before a judge on Tuesday, and everyone else have to wait years sometimes for their cases to be heard. Justice is unfair in SVG. If I sue the government I will have to waits years for my case, but if they sue I am going court before I could even change my clothes. And even if I win my case that’s not a guarantee that they are going to abide by what the judge say. Sometimes I just have to laugh. Only in SVG. I tell yo boy.

  5. junior cumberbatch says:

    BLANE WAT COUNTRY U IN.PICKETING ILLEGALLY IN FRONT GG OFFICE AND BEING ASKING TO MOVE AND NOT COMPLY.REALLY.D POLICE ARE STILL PEACEFUL IN SVG. ITS NOT HAPPENING ANYWHERE ELSE.NOT USA FOR SURE

    1. @ junior cumberbatch

      Let me tell you something Junior, if it’s one man who can backup everything he says it’s me so don’t even try your nonsense. You said that no one can protest illegally in any other country, well I don’t know about protesting illegally, but here is a link of protestors in the states blocking a government officials home. https://www.popularresistance.org/breaking-net-neutrality-activists-blockade-fcc-chairman-tom-wheelers-house/

      And that is in the USA they did that. If they did that in SVG Then the government would have said it was illegal and locked them up, the government say and do what ever they want in SVG. Aren’t you all tired of making excuse for nonsense?. I have never heard of illegal protest in SVG before now. And it’s not something I want to hear again, it’s just stupid.

  6. For all those who now quick to talk about upholding traffic laws, where were these voices during the road block revolution of 2000. Am guessing back then these obstructions offenses and traffic laws weren’t existent.

    Surprisingly, these same voices aren’t inquiring as to the statute of limitations for these laws and/or pushing for those of the 2000 road block revolution to face the same justice.

    1. Clynton Morris says:

      The comments by ‘OK then’ and Blane are what frightens me of making a permanent return to SVG and more so, moving forward for the betterment of all of society. I say this because if one remarks on a civil society, by this to uphold the law of a country, and the reaction to this is: they’ve done it 5, 10 or 20 years ago so it’s right to do I now; then, we’ll never move forward in our overall development.

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